• control charts,  ggQC

    ggQC | ggplot Quality Control Charts – New Release

    The ggQC package is a quality control extension for ggplot. Use it to create XmR, XbarR, C and many other highly customizable Control Charts. Additional statistical process control functions include Shewart violation checks as well as capability analysis. If your process is running smoothly, visualize the potential impacted of your next process improvement with a Pareto chart. To learn more, read on! To get started with ggQC, install it from CRAN by running the following code: 1 install.packages("ggQC")install.packages("ggQC") ggQC Control Charts Control charts are a great way to monitor process outputs, drive improvement, and evaluate measurement systems. The types of control chart types supported by ggQC include: Individuals Charts :…

  • IO,  rlang

    Windows Clipboard Access with R

    The windows clipboard is a quick way to get data in and out of R. How can we exploit this feature to accomplish our basic data exploration needs and when might its use be inappropriate? Read on. Overview Paste Data from Clipboard to R HTML Tables Spreadsheets Copy Data from R to Clipboard Summary and Usage Notes Paste Data from Clipboard to R We won't be using it in this post, but you can see the contents of the Windows clipboard in R using the readClipboard() command. Going through the documentation you'll note a variety of formats that can be read. For our purposes, we are looking at moving text…

  • Shiny Lost in the Braces
    Shiny

    Source and List: Organizing R Shiny Apps

    Keeping R Shiny code organized can be a challenge. One method to organize your Shiny UI and Server code is to use a combination of R’s list and source functions. Another method to organize you’re Shiny code is through modularization techniques. Here though, we’re going concentrate on the list and source options. If you feel comfortable with Shiny and want to get strait to the answer, check out the Solution section. Otherwise, read on! Outline Difficulty Organizing Shiny UIs A UI Source Example That Usually Doesn’t Work When Source Fails in the UI Solution Usage Note Organizing the Shiny Server with Source Summary Difficulty Organizing Shiny UIs If you have…

  • control charts

    Estimating Control Chart Constants with R

    In this post, I will show you how a very basic R code can be used to estimate quality control constants needed to construct X-Individuals, X-Bar, and R-Bar charts. The value of this approach is that it gives you a mechanical sense of where these constants come from and some reinforcement on their application. If you work in a production or quality control environment, chances are you’ve made or seen a control chart. If you’re new to control charting or need a refresher check out Understanding Statistical Process Control, Wheeler et. al. If you want to dive in and start making control charts with R, check out R packages ggQC:…

  • rlang

    Infamous Inf – Part II

    R’s Inf keyword – Have you’ve ever wondered what to do with it? If so, this is the second in series of posts that explore how we can exploit the keyword’s interesting properties to get the answers we need and improve code robustness. If you want to catch up on the first post where we look at Inf and the cut() function, please see Infamous Inf – Part I For those unfamiliar with R’s Inf keyword, it is defined as a positive or negative number divided by zero yielding positive or negative infinity, respectively. c(plus_inf = 1/0, minus_inf = -1/0) # plus_inf minus_inf # Inf -Inf Sounds very theoretical. So…

  • rlang

    Infamous Inf – Part I

    R’s Inf keyword – Have you’ve ever wondered what to do with it? If so, this is the first in series of posts that explore how we can exploit the keyword’s interesting properties to get the answers we need and improve code robustness. For those unfamiliar with R’s Inf keyword, it is defined as a positive or negative number divided by zero yielding positive or negative infinity, respectively. c(plus_inf = 1/0, minus_inf = -1/0) # plus_inf minus_inf # Inf -Inf Sounds very theoretical. So how we can make practical use of infinity in R? In this first post, we’ll be discussing how Inf can make binning data with cut() a…

  • ggQC

    Control Charts with ggQC: XmR

    Preparing an XmR plot is common when dealing with processes where a single product/item is made or measured and there is a significant time gap between the next production or observation. XmR plots can also be useful when dealing with outputs from a batch process rather than a continuous one. In this post, we will show how to make quick QC XmR plots with the ggQC package available on cran or github. cran: install.package("ggQC") To get us started, let’s simulate some data on the diameter of a golden egg produced monthly by a golden goose. set.seed(5555) Golden_Egg_df <- data.frame(month=1:12, egg_diameter = rnorm(n = 12, mean = 1.5, sd = 0.2) )…

  • ggQC

    Control Charts with ggQC: XbarR

    XbarR charts are useful when monitoring a continuous process over time and your taking multiple samples in a given period. Some examples might include, the first, middle, and last parts coming off an assembly line, subgroups of molded parts produced several at a time over several cycles, batch uniformity of continuously produced chemical / material. In this post, we will show how to make quick QC XbarR plots with the ggQC package available on cran or github. cran: install.package("ggQC") Generating an Xbar or XbarR plot with ggQC is simple. To get us started, let’s simulate some production line data on candles. The candles are shaped using a mold capable of producing…